Skip to content

Something Different: Cyrillus Kleek’s The Sun shall not smite thee (Psalm 121), performed by Vox Clamantis

November 25, 2020

From Estonia, here is a wondrous version of Psalm 121, performed by the ensemble Vox Clamantis. I will post the text in Estonian and in English below the video. The lyrics come from the 5:4 blog – a very interesting blog on music.

Estonian text:

Päeval ei pea päikene sind vaevama, ega öösel kuu.
Ma tõstan oma silmad üles mägede poole, kust minu abi tuleb.
Mu abi tuled Jehoova käest, kes kõik on teinud, kõik teaeva, maa on teinud.
Jehoova on, kes hoiab Sind, Jehoova on su vari, sinu paremal käel.
Päeval ei pea päekene sind vaevama, ega öösel kuu.
Ma tõstan oma silmad üles mägede poole.

English text:

The sun shall not smite thee by day, nor the moon by night.
I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help.
My help cometh from the Lord, which made heaven and earth.
The Lord is thy keeper, the Lord is thy shade upon thy right hand.
The sun shall not smite thee by day, nor the moon by night.
I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills.

The Rev. Dr. Eric Parker: “The Joy of Grace & Gratitude”: A Sermon for Thanksgiving Day (transferred), 2020

November 24, 2020

From the Rev. Dr. Eric Parker of St. Paul’s Anglican Church, Lexington, Virginia, here is a sermon titled “The Joy of Grace & Gratitude.” The sermon notes on Soundcloud say: “Gratitude is one of the greatest Christian virtues. It is a perfect picture of the Image of God, as we receive God’s gifts and long to return thanks for them. Gratitude is an essential part of our duties toward God & neighbor. It conquers all fear through faith in the provision of God, who has given us all things in Jesus Christ our Lord.” This is a very good message for this Thanksgiving season.

The First Sunday in Advent: Prepare

November 23, 2020

As mentioned previously, Fr. Bill Klock has a new project for this coming church year: “Preaching the Traditional One-Year Lectionary from a Narrative-Historical Perspective”. This week he gives his thoughts on the readings for the First Sunday in Advent. I think you will find these very helpful and I thank Fr. Bill for doing this.

The Anglican Expositor

This is part of a series of posts on preaching the Church Year in narrative-historical perspective. More on this project can be found in thisintroduction.

The times and seasons of the Church have, since its earliest days, been reckoned by the incarnation and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah. The earliest tradition saw the Christian Year beginning at Easter. Our brethren in the Eastern Orthodox churches continue to observe Easter as the beginning of their year. When Christmas was instituted in the Fourth Century, it became the beginning of the Christian Year at Rome and from there to the other Western churches. The ancient sacramentaries begin the Church Year with the Vigil of Christmas.

The season of Advent is something of a melding of two traditions, one of a decidedly festal nature and the other penitential. As far back as St. Jerome’s lectionary we see Collects, Epistles, and Gospels…

View original post 2,634 more words

From All Saints Anglican Church of San Antonio: Chanted Morning Prayer for the Sunday Next Before Advent

November 22, 2020

If you are looking for an online service for this Sunday, try this 1928 BCP service, with the 1940 Hymnal, from All Saints Anglican Church of San Antonio, done by Fr. Isaac Rehberg.  I think you will agree that it is very well done, and you will be blessed.  I will copy the order of worship below the video.

According to the American 1928 Book of Common Prayer, the 1940 Hymnal, and the St. Dunstan’s Plainsong Psalter

  • Opening Hymn: #356 “At the Name of Jesus” verses 1-3
  • Morning Prayer Begins on Page 3, BCP
  • Venite (Page 9, BCP; Page 325, St. Dunstan’s Plainsong Psalter)
  • Psalm 145 (Page 520, BCP; Page 209, Psalter)
  • 1st Lesson: Jeremiah 23:5-8 (Page 225, BCP)
  • 1st Canticle: Te Deum (Page 10, BCP; Page 351, Psalter)
  • 2nd Lesson: John 6:5-14 (Page 225, BCP)
  • 2nd Canticle: Benedictus (Page 14, BCP; Page 397 Psalter)
  • Collect for the Day: Sunday Next Before Advent (Page 225, BCP)
  • Closing Hymn: #356 “At the Name of Jesus” verses 4-5

The Rev. Dr. Benjamin Bernier: “Overcoming Evil with Good”

November 21, 2020

From the Rev. Benjamin Bernier of Providence REC in Corpus Christi, Texas, here is a message titled “Overcoming Evil with Good”. This is a very good sermon on forgiveness and reconciliation being the best way to respond to Evil against us. There are times this may be difficult, but it is indeed the best way.

An interesting new podcast: “This We Believe” by Fr. Michael Niebauer

November 20, 2020

This week I came across the podcast This We Believe by the Rev. Michael Nieubauer, rector of Incarnation Church in State College, PA. This is its stated purpose:

This We Believe explains the essentials of the Christian faith and its impact on our lives. Each season will use key texts as springboards for exploring the core tenets of Christianity, beginning with the Apostles’ Creed and continuing with texts such as the 10 Commandments and the Our Father. While each season will progress through these documents, each episode will be centered around a specific topic, such as the Cross, or the Holy Spirit, or a specific question, such as What happens when I die? or Why is there suffering the world? The goal is to provide an insightful and exciting theological education whether you have been following Christ for 8 days or 8 decades.

Here is the very first episode, and you can go check out the others.

J.C. Ryle on the cost of one’s religion

November 19, 2020

Here, from J.C. Ryle’s Holiness, is a warning that sounds very much like Bonhoeffer’s warning against “cheap grace”:

In conclusion, let every reader of this paper think seriously, whether his religion costs him anything at present. Very likely it costs you nothing. Very probably it neither costs you trouble, nor time, nor thought, nor care, nor pains, nor reading, nor praying, nor self-denial, nor conflict, nor working, nor labour of any kind. Now mark what I say. Such a religion as this will never save your soul. It will never give you peace while you live, nor hope while you die. It will not support you in the day of affliction, nor cheer you in the hour of death. A religion which costs nothing is worth nothing. Awake before it is too late. Awake and repent. Awake and be converted. Awake and believe. Awake and pray. Rest not till you can give a satisfactory answer to my question, “What does it cost?

It makes me wonder whether Bonhoeffer had read Ryle when he wrote The Cost of Discipleship.

From the Choir of Exeter Cathedral: Psalm 4 (Cum invocarem)

November 18, 2020

Here is another Psalm in Anglican chant, performed by the Choir of Exeter Cathedral – Psalm 4. I will paste the text below the video.

HEAR me when I call, O God of my righteousness : thou hast set me at liberty when I was in trouble; have mercy upon me, and hearken unto my prayer.

2 O ye sons of men, how long will ye blaspheme mine honour : and have such pleasure in vanity, and seek after leasing? (see note 1)

3 Know this also, that the Lord hath chosen to himself the man that is godly : when I call upon the Lord he will hear me.

4 Stand in awe, and sin not : commune with your own heart, and in your chamber, and be still.

5 Offer the sacrifice of righteousness : and put your trust in the Lord.

6 There be many that say : Who will show us any good?

7 Lord, lift thou up: the light of thy countenance upon us.

8 Thou hast put gladness in my heart : since the time that their corn and wine and oil increased.

9 I will lay me down in peace, and take my rest : for it is thou, Lord, only, that makest me dwell in safety.

(Note 1.) International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. LEASING -lez’-ing “to devise,” “to fabricate,” hence, “to lie”; occurs but twice in the King James Version; the Hebrew word is translated “liars” (Ps 116:11); “lie” or deceive (Job 6:2 ): The idea of treachery, lying, and deceit, lies at the root of this word. Psalm 5:6 “them that speak LEASING.” – AV 1611 GOD’S WORD (Text and note provided by Ron Wilson on YouTube)

The Sunday Next Before Advent: The Faithfulness of God

November 17, 2020

As I mentioned last week, Fr. Bill Klock has a new project for this coming church year: “Preaching the Traditional One-Year Lectionary from a Narrative-Historical Perspective”. This week he gives his thoughts on the readings for the Sunday Next Before Advent. I think you will find these very helpful and I thank Fr. Bill for doing this.

The Anglican Expositor

This is part of a series of posts on preaching the Church Year in narrative-historical perspective. More on this project can be found in this introduction.

This last Sunday of the Church Year is unique to the English Church so far as modern lectionaries are concerned. In contrast to that of the Prayer Book, the pre-Vatican II Roman lectionary provides propers for only twenty-four Sunday after Pentecost, while the lectionary of the Lutheran churches provides for twenty-seven, none corresponding to our propers for this last Sunday before Advent. These traditions can be traced back to the lectionary of St. Jerome and the Sacramentary of St. Gregory, the former of which reflects an earlier time and a five-week Advent season. Our Collect, Epistle, and Gospel come to us straight from the Sarum Missal along with this title, the Sunday Next Before Advent. This day in the Sarum Missal, with its…

View original post 2,329 more words

From Stand Firm: “Who Are These People? The Limits of Compassion”

November 16, 2020

From Stand Firm, here is a timely podcast on “Who Are These People? The Limits of Compassion”.